Thursday, 24 November 2016

Permethrin

Re the inadvertent presence of permethrin in a brand of cat flea control products http://pettradextra.newsweaver.com/…/1is1zfxy1hl1p2fkpfehwg… it's worth reviewing the situation for rabbits. This chemical is VERY toxic in cats, and much less so in rabbits, but given the unknown nature of the situation, in particular how much is present in the product, we would strongly advise against using this product on rabbits, and to return it immediately. As a general rule, it's important to only use flea control products designed for and licensed for rabbits, unless given under the direction of your veterinary surgeon. In particular, products containing the drug Fipronil are contra-indicated in rabbits

Eravac

"With regard to the recent licensing of ERAVAC in the UK, we are pleased that another option to help prevent RHD2 is available. However, due to the lack of some product information it makes it difficult to give accurate advice at this time. We are discussing this situation, and its impact on other vaccine types, with the VMD and in the meantime can only suggest that owners and vets discuss the options and make a decision based on the specific circumstances of the rabbit(s)."

Thursday, 3 November 2016

Filavac makes top 10 SIC in last two quarters

Between 1st April 2016 and 30th September 2016, according to the Veterinary Medicine Directorate newsletter "MAVIS" 2025 Special Import Certificates were issued for "Filavac". Combining this with the results of an FOI request in July, showing how many doses were requested for each application, we estimate that somewhere around 72,500 rabbits may have been vaccinated to date. This is down to the tireless efforts of Rabbit owners in requesting this vaccine from their vets, those owners and others who have catalogued cases of RHD2 and made that information available to inform decision making, and vets, vet nurses and practice managers who have organised SICs, importing, and vaccine clinics for their practice. We are also eternally grateful to Dr Richard Saunders for making this process possible in the first place by establishing the demand for the vaccine and setting it up with the VMD, and the veterinary wholesalers for making the vaccine available. Whilst its always important to note that no vaccine offers 100% protection, and that there are occasional side-effects to vaccination, we are very pleased that its been possible to offer the best possible protection to the UK's rabbits over the past few months. FOI Source: https://www.gov.uk/government

EPRAVAC RHD2 vaccine

The recent licensing of EPRAVAC RHD2 vaccine for use in the UK is important in that it further recognises the concerns of the regulatory authorities and drug companies that RHD2 is a serious health and welfare concern to UK rabbits. However, there are a few caveats here, related to its origin as a vaccine for meat rabbits. The vaccine duration of action has not been determined, as meat rabbits are typically slaughtered very early in life. In fact, the product characteristics state: "Vaccinate only fattening rabbits. No information is available on the safety and efficacy in other categories such as breeding or pet rabbits." In addition, the vaccine is oil adjuvanted, necessitating the following user warning: *Eravac is an emulsion containing mineral oil. Accidental injection may cause severe pain and selling, particularly if injected into a joint or finger – this could result in the loss of the finger if prompt medical attention is not given. If someone is accidentally injected with this product, they must seek medical attention immediately even if only a very small amount is injected. The package leaflet should be shown to the doctor. If pain persists for more than 12 hours after medical examination, the doctor should be contacted again.* For these reasons, we feel that other vaccines, such as Filavac, covering RHD2 are preferable for the pet and rabbit population in the UK. As ever, rabbit owners are urged to discuss the specifics of their rabbit's care with their own vets, and those vets are welcome to contact RWAF for further discussion should they wish to.