Thursday, 12 June 2014

To burr or not to burr? When is a dental required?

We have been contacted by several people regarding something very interesting they have read on another page so here are our thoughts on dental issues in rabbits: 1) Incisor teeth should always be burred and not clipped. Clipping causes further damage to the tooth roots and should be avoided. It is also painful and should not ever be attempted as a DIY measure at home. We consider this to be barbaric. 2) Have regular dental checks with a rabbit savvy vet. (Don't forget we hold a rabbit friendly vet list e-mail us at hq@rabbitwelfare.co.uk) 3) Weigh your rabbits at home every week. 4) If your rabbits are eating normally, not loosing weight, not slobbering, , and have no abscesses that you can feel along the jaw then there is generally no need for the rabbit to under go a dental. The main reasons for a rabbit to require a dental are: A) A molar spur or significantly elongated molar tooth which is pressing in to the tongue or cheek and causing discomfort,change in food preference, ie avoiding hard foods, loss of appetite, slobbering. B) Misaligned teeth are sadly very common, and very few rabbit mouths will look good under inspection, however this does not mean that a dental is required. If in doubt, then have a check the following week or so to make sure that the problem has not worsened and that weight has been maintained. C) Abscesses or bone infection developing around teeth. This may not be detected with the naked eye, and is one reason why your vet may recommend xrays of your rabbit's skull

2 comments:

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  2. Infections or navicular bone disease creating around tooth. This may not be recognized with the nude eye, and is one purpose why your vet may suggest xrays of your rabbit's head


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