Tuesday, 10 June 2014

Preparing for a trip to the vets

Lulu and Jake had their vaccinations last week, and as part of this had a full check. Our vet, Orlaith noticed that Lulu had the a spur on her molar. She was eating well, not slavering, so we booked her in today to have it burred. If she had been showing any signs of discomfort or not eating she would have needed it doing much sooner. So, we had 5 days to prepare Lulu for her dental today. We get a lot of calls to the helpline from people that have brought rabbits home from the vet who are not eating for example so we thought the following would be useful. Before any of this of course make sure you have a rabbit savvy vet. We hold a list of rabbit friendly vets and this is available to anyone from the helpline, 0844 324 6090 or by e-mailing us on hq@rabbitwelfare.co.uk 1) Carry case. Make sure you have a carry case that opens at the top. You do not want to be trying to get a rabbit out of a front opening carry case because they always splay their back legs and it ends up being a battle. Much easier if they are easily accessed from the top. Also, if you know your vet trip is a few days away, place the carry case in the rabbits' environment and let them get used to it, feed them in it, so that the journey to the vet is less stressful. 2) Food. On the morning of the vet trip make sure you give your rabbit her favourite breakfast. Take a packed lunch with you, of all of your rabbit's favourite foods (herbs and dandelions are a favourite. and some of their usual pellets) We do not recommend fruit as part of a daily diet, but after an operation we can relax a little bit, we want them to be eating asap so we need to tempt them. A juicy nectarine or bit of apple would not be something we would give every day, but it might be just the thing to get the rabbit to start to eat again on her own. And don't forget to have some critical care / recovery sachets to hand in case you need to syringe feed too. 3) Travel. Sounds obvious, but rabbits find car journey's stressful, so no loud music, and make sure the carry case is secure on the seat with the seatbelt secured through the handle. 4) Companion. If your rabbit lives with another rabbit companion, take them both to the vet. Bonded pairs should not be separated and it will be less stressful for them to be kept together. This can often help the recovery of the rabbit that is having the operation. 5) Back home. Your rabbit should be alert and eating before being discharged. Make sure you keep them warm overnight, so this might mean keeping them indoors unless it is very warm outside, and be vigilant. Make sure they are eating and drinking as normal, otherwise you will need to syringe feed. Rabbits that are in pain will not eat, so make sure that your rabbit has had pain relief if needed, and you have some to give at home in the days following the procedure. If in any doubt, ring your vet!

1 comment:

  1. At house. Your bunny should be aware and consuming before being released. Create sure you keep them heated over night, so this might mean maintaining them in the house unless it is very heated outside, and be cautious. Create sure they are meals as regular, otherwise you will need to needle nourish. Bunnies that are in discomfort will not eat, so ensure that that your bunny has had treatment if required, and you have some to provide at house in the times following the process. If in any question, band your vet!



    Incinerador de Grasa

    ReplyDelete